1981days since
Cringeworthy of Month Results

cringeworthy - defined

cringeworthy, defined

As words go, cringeworthy is relatively new and we have the Brits to thank for it.  Below are the official definitions and time line from the Oxford English Dictionary of cringeworthy and its cousins.

Oxford English Dictionary


cringeworthy, colloq. (orig. Brit.)

Causing (or liable to cause) one to cringe with acute embarrassment, awkwardness, disgust, etc.; freq. designating or relating to an artistic production or performance which exhibits embarrassing incompetence, pretension, or sentimentality.

1972 Beano 1 Apr. 10 ‘This is our new little chum Cuthbert Cringeworthy.’ ‘Greetings, ugly pupils!’] 1990 Independent 30 Mar. 14/6 He makes a virtue of using rhyming couplets by occasionally turning the device into a joke itself with cringeworthy rhymes{em}‘I know I must do what I'm told / Fathers know better because they're old.’ 1995 Alternative Press May 97/1 Most Caucasians who play ‘soul’ music make cringeworthy spectacles of themselves, especially Brits. 2001 Sugar Feb. 13 Got a cringeworthy memory that still makes you blush when you think about it? Don't worry, 'cause you're not alone.

cringemakingly, Brit. colloq.

[< CRINGE-MAKING a. + -LY2.] 

    Such as to make one cringe; so intensely embarrassing, shameful, sentimental, etc., that one might cringe.










1996
1984
2002
 _1100_ _1200_ _1300_ _1400_ _1500_ _1600_ _1700_ _1800_ _1900_ _2000_ _2100_

cringe* * * * * *

[Cringe (crintch), first found in 16th c., appears to be a phonetic modification (with ordinary Eng. change of eng, enge, to ing, inge, as in hinge, singe, wing: see CLINK v.2) of an earlier crenge, found with variant crenche early in 13th c. Crenge, crenche, represent OE. *cr{ehook}ncgean, *cr{ehook}ncean (:{em}*krangjan, *krankjan), causal deriv. of the strong verb found in OE. with the double form cringan, crincan to draw oneself together spasmodically, to contract or shrink together into a bent or crooked position: see CRANK n.1 Primarily then crengen, crenchen was transitive, but already in 13th c. we find ‘cringe with the neck’.] 

    {dag}1. trans. To compress, draw together, or draw in (any part of the body) as in shrinking from pain or danger; to contract, distort (the neck, face, etc.). Obs.






1598 c1630
1606




 _1100_ _1200_ _1300_ _1400_ _1500_ _1600_ _1700_ _1800_ _1900_ _2000_ _2100_

    2. intr.    a. To draw in or contract the muscles of the body involuntarily; to shrink.    b. To shrink in or away (as with fear); to cower.



a1225
a1455 1597 1684 c1750
1719
1861
1847


 _1100_ _1200_ _1300_ _1400_ _1500_ _1600_ _1700_ _1800_ _1900_ _2000_ _2100_

    3. intr. To bend the body timorously or servilely; to cower. Often applied derisively or depreciatively to bowing, with the implication of attendant servility or cowardice. Const. to (a person).






1575-
97
c1680
1647
1621-
51

1853

 _1100_ _1200_ _1300_ _1400_ _1500_ _1600_ _1700_ _1800_ _1900_ _2000_ _2100_

    4. fig. To behave obsequiously or with mean submissiveness; to show base or servile deference.







1660-
72
c1620

1855

 _1100_ _1200_ _1300_ _1400_ _1500_ _1600_ _1700_ _1800_ _1900_ _2000_ _2100_

    5. trans.    {dag}a. To bow deferentially to (a person).    b. To bow a person in or out with cringes.







1660
1609

1822

 _1100_ _1200_ _1300_ _1400_ _1500_ _1600_ _1700_ _1800_ _1900_ _2000_ _2100_

DRAFT ADDITIONS MARCH 2002

    cringe, v.

  * intr. fig. To experience an involuntary inward shiver of embarrassment, awkwardness, disgust, etc.; to wince or shrink inwardly; (hence) to feel extremely embarrassed or uncomfortable. Freq. with at.









1868 1993
1974
1961
1918

 _1100_ _1200_ _1300_ _1400_ _1500_ _1600_ _1700_ _1800_ _1900_ _2000_ _2100_
Comments